Adenosine

18/Description

About

Adenosine is a chemical that is present in all human cells. It readily combines with phosphate to form various chemical compounds including adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). People use it for medicine.

AMP is taken by mouth for treating shingles (herpes zoster infection) and a blood disorder called porphyria cutanea tarda.

ATP is used under the tongue to increase physical energy. It is also given intravenously (by IV) for treating acute kidney failure, multiple organ failure, high blood pressure in lung arteries (pulmonary hypertension), cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, weight loss associated with cancer, and controlling blood pressure during anesthesia and surgery. It is also used for cardiac stress tests.

Healthcare providers give adenosine intravenously for treating surgical pain and nerve pain, pulmonary hypertension, and certain types of irregular heartbeat. It is also given for controlling blood pressure during anesthesia and surgery and for heart tests called cardiac stress tests.

Adenosine is injected into the space around the spinal cord to treat nerve pain.

Adenosine phosphate is given by injection into the muscle (intramuscularly) for treating varicose veins, bursitis, pain and swollen tendons (tendonitis), itchiness, multiple sclerosis (MS), neuropathy, shingles (herpes zoster infection), cold sores and genital herpes (herpes simplex infections), and poor blood circulation.

How it works

Adenosine blocks faulty circuitry in the heart, which causes irregular heart rhythm. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) might prevent changes in energy metabolism that cause weight loss in people with advanced cancer.

Effectiveness

Effective
Treating certain kinds of irregular heartbeat (as a prescription-only intravenous medicine)

Concerns

Adenosine appears to be safe for most people when given by injection by qualified healthcare givers. It can cause breathing problems and chest pain, particularly when given at high doses. Headache, heart pounding, low blood pressure, nausea, sweating, flushing, lightheadedness, sleep problems, coughing, and anxiety can also occur.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of adenosine duringpregnancyandbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Are there any interactions with medications?

Gout: ATP can raise the level of uric acid in the blood stream and in the urine, and this might trigger a case of gout. Gout causes red, hot, tender, swollen joints. The joint that is most often affected is at the base of the big toe.

Heart disease: ATP can cause reduced blood flow to the heart and chest pain. It might worsen symptoms in patients with heart diseases such as chest pain and heart attack.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Major
Dipyridamole (Persantine)

The body breaks down adenosine to get rid of it. Dipyridamole (Persantine) can decrease the break down of adenosine. Decreasing the breakdown of adenosine can cause heart problems. Do not take adenosine if you are taking dipyridamole (Persantine).

Moderate
Carbamazepine (Tegretol)

Adenosine can slow down the heartbeat. Taking carbamazepine (Tegretol) with adenosine might cause the heart to beat too slowly. Do not take adenosine if you are taking carbamazepine (Tegretol).

Minor
Methylxanthines

Gout is caused by a build-up of uric acid crystals in the joints. Adenosine can increase uric acid in the body and might reduce the effectiveness of medications for gout.Some medications for gout include allopurinol (Zyloprim), colchicine, probenecid (Benemid), and others.Methylxanthines might block the effects of adenosine. Adenosine is often used by doctors to do a test on the heart. This test is called a cardiac stress test. Stop drinking black tea or other caffeine containing products at least 24 hours before a cardiac stress test.Methylxanthines include aminophylline, caffeine, and theophylline.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com