Artichoke

Botanicals

18/Description

About

Artichoke is a plant. The leaf, stem, and root are used to make “extracts” which contain a high concentration of certain chemicals found in the plant. These extracts are used as medicine.

Artichoke is used to stimulate the flow of bile from the liver, and this is thought to help reduce the symptoms of heartburn and alcohol “hangover.” Artichoke is also used for high cholesterol, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), kidney problems, anemia, fluid retention (edema), arthritis, bladder infections, and liver problems.

Some people use artichoke for treating snakebites, preventing gallstones, lowering blood pressure, lowering blood sugar; to increase urine flow; and as a tonic or stimulant.

In foods, artichoke leaves and extracts are used to flavor beverages. Cynarin and chlorogenic acid, which are chemicals found in artichoke, are sometimes used as sweeteners.

Don't confuse artichoke with Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus).

How it works

Artichoke has chemicals that can reduce nausea and vomiting, spasms, and intestinal gas. These chemicals have also been shown to lower cholesterol.

Effectiveness

Possibly Effective
Indigestion

Artichoke leaf extract seems to reduce symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, flatulence, and stomach pain in people with indigestion. Improvement seems to occur after 2 to 8 weeks of treatment.

High cholesterol

Taking a specific artichoke extract (Valverde Artischocke, Novartis Consumer Health) seems to modestly reduce total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol, and the LDL/high density lipoprotein (HDL or “good”) ratio after 6 to 12 weeks of treatment. Studies using cynarin, a specific chemical found in artichoke, have shown conflicting results. Drinking frozen artichoke juice does not seem to lower cholesterol levels and may increase levels of blood fats called triglycerides.

Concerns

Likely safe

Artichoke is LIKELY SAFE when consumed in amounts used in foods

Possibly safe

Artichoke is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth as a medicine. It has been used safely in research for up to 23 months.In some people, artichoke can cause some side effects such as intestinal gas and allergic reactions. People at the greatest risk of allergic reactions are those who are allergic to plants such as marigolds, daisies, and other similar herbs.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking artichoke if you arepregnantorbreast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Dosing considerations for Artichoke.

Bile duct obstruction: There is concern that artichoke might worsen bile duct obstruction by increasing bile flow. If you have this condition, don't use artichoke without first discussing your decision with your healthcare provider.

Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Artichoke may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking artichoke.

Gallstones: Artichoke might make gallstones worse by increasing bile flow; use artichoke with caution.

Interactions

No information available.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional.