Bergamot

18/Description

About

Bergamot is a plant that produces a type of citrus fruit. Oil taken from the peel of the fruit is used to make medicine.

Some people treat a skin condition called psoriasis by applying bergamot oil directly to the skin and then shining long-wave ultraviolet (UV) light on the affected area. Bergamot oil is also applied to the skin then exposed to UV light to treat a type of cancer that begins in white blood cells and affects the skin (mycosis fungoides). Bergamot oil is also applied for pigment loss (vitiligo) and as an insecticide to protect the body against lice and other parasites.

Bergamot oil is sometimes inhaled (used as aromatherapy) to reduce anxiety during radiation treatment.

In foods, bergamot oil is widely used as a citrus flavoring agent, especially in gelatins and puddings.

In manufacturing, bergamot oil is used in perfumes, creams, lotions, soaps, and suntan oils.

How it works

Bergamot oil has several active chemicals. These chemicals can make the skin sensitive to sunlight.

Effectiveness

Possibly Ineffective
Mental alertness

Using bergamot oil as aromatherapy does not seem to improve mental alertness. In fact, it might decrease mental alertness in heathy adults due to its relaxing effects.

Concerns

Likely safe

Bergamot oil is LIKELY SAFE for most people in the small amounts found in food

Possibly unsafe

It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used on the skin (topically), because it can make the skin sensitive to the sun and more vulnerable to skin cancer. People who work with bergamot can develop skin problems including blisters, scabs, pigment spots, rashes, sensitivity to the sun, and cancerous changes.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Children: Bergamot oil isPOSSIBLY UNSAFEin children when taken bymouthin large amounts. There have been seriousside effects, includingconvulsionanddeath, in children who have taken large amounts of bergamot oil.Are there any interactions with medications?

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Do not use bergamot oil on your skin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE.

Diabetes: Bergamot might lower blood sugar levels. This could affect blood sugar control in people with diabetes and cause blood sugar levels to go to low. Monitor your blood sugar closely.

Surgery: Bergamot might lower blood sugar. There is some concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during surgery. Stop using bergamot at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Medications used for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)

Some medications can increase sensitivity to sunlight. Topical use of bergamot oil might also increase your sensitivity to sunlight. Using bergamot oil topically along with medication that increase sensitivity to sunlight could increase the chances of sunburn, blistering or rashes on areas of skin exposed to sunlight. Be sure to wear sunblock and protective clothing when spending time in the sun.Some drugs that cause photosensitivity include amitriptyline (Elavil), Ciprofloxacin (Cipro), norfloxacin (Noroxin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), ofloxacin (Floxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), gatifloxacin (Tequin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Septra), tetracycline, methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen, 8-MOP, Oxsoralen), and Trioxsalen (Trisoralen).Bergamot might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking bergamot along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional.