Black Nightshade

18/Description

About

Black nightshade is a plant. Originally, black nightshade was called “petit (small) morel” to distinguish it from the more poisonous species, deadly nightshade, that is known as “great morel.” You may hear black nightshade mistakenly referred to as “petty” morel, instead of the correct term, “petit” moral. People use the whole black nightshade plant including leaves, fruit, and root to make medicine.

Despite serious safety concerns, black nightshade has been used for stomach irritation, cramps, spasms, pain, and nervousness.

Some people apply black nightshade directly to the skin for a skin condition called psoriasis, hemorrhoids, and deep skin infections (abscesses). The bruised, fresh leaves are put on the skin to treat swelling (inflammation), burns, and ulcers.

How it works

There isn't enough information to know how black nightshade might work as a medicine.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Stomach irritation
Cramps
Spasms
Pain
Nervousness
Hemorrhoids, when applied to the skin
Skin inflammation, when applied to the skin
Burns, when applied to the skin
Other conditions

Concerns

Unsafe

Black nightshade is UNSAFE to take by mouth. It contains a toxic chemical called solanin. At lower doses, it can cause nausea, vomiting, headache, and other side effects. At higher doses, it can cause severe poisoning. Signs of poisoning include irregular heartbeat, trouble breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, twitching of the arms and legs, cramps, diarrhea, paralysis, coma, and death.There isn't enough information to know whether it is safe to apply black nightshade directly to the skin.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It'sUNSAFEto take black nightshade if you arepregnant. It might cause birth defects.Dosing considerations for Black Nightshade.

Interactions

No information available.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional.