Caprylic Acid

18/Description

About

Caprylic acid is a medium-chain fatty acid that is found in palm oil, coconut oil, and the milk of humans and bovines.

Caprylic acid is taken by mouth for epilepsy (seizures), low levels of the blood protein albumin in people undergoing dialysis, digestive disorders such as dysbiosis (abnormal levels of bacteria in the stomach), abnormal absorption of fats, and chylothorax (leakage of a substance called chyle into the chest cavity).

When taken as part of a ketogenic or medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) diet, caprylic acid seems to help reduce the number of seizures in people with epilepsy. However, side effects and difficulty following the diet seem to limit its long-term use. More evidence is needed to rate caprylic acid for this use.

How it works

Caprylic acid might lower blood pressure in some people. It can also be given to people as part of a test used to measure gastric emptying.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Epilepsy (seizures)

Epilepsy (seizures) When taken as part of a ketogenic or medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) diet, caprylic acid seems to help reduce the number of seizures in people with epilepsy. However, side effects and difficulty following the diet seem to limit its long-term use.

Low blood levels of albumin (hypoalbuminemia) in people undergoing dialysis
Digestive disorders
Abnormal absorption of fats (lipid malabsorption)
Reducing the leakage of a substance called chyle into the chest cavity (chylothorax)
Other conditions.

Concerns

Likely safe

Caprylic acid is LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth in food amounts or when used at approved doses for nutritional supplementation and in tests to measure stomach emptying. It can cause some side effects, including nausea, bloating, and diarrhea

Possibly safe

Caprylic acid is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth as part of a ketogenic diet or a diet high in medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) under the guidance of a physician. However, diets containing high amounts of caprylic acid might cause constipation, vomiting, stomach pain, low levels of calcium in the blood, drowsiness, or growth problems

Likely unsafe

Caprylic acid is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth by people with a condition known as medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency. People with this condition are not able to break down caprylic acid appropriately. This can lead to increased levels of caprylic acid in the blood, which may increase the risk of comas.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of caprylic acid duringpregnancyandbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Liver disease: Caprylic acid is broken down by the liver. There is some concern that people with liver disease might not be able to break down caprylic acid. This might cause blood levels of caprylic acid to increase. However, other research suggests that people with liver disease are still able to break down caprylic acid. Until more is known, use with caution.

Low blood pressure (hypotension): Caprylic acid can lower blood pressure. In theory, caprylic acid might cause blood pressure to go too low if used by people prone to low blood pressure. Use with caution.Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency: People with MCAD deficiency are not able to break down caprylic acid appropriately. This can lead to increased levels of caprylic acid in the blood, which might increase the risk of comas. Avoid using.

Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency: People with MCAD deficiency are not able to break down caprylic acid appropriately. This can lead to increased levels of caprylic acid in the blood, which might increase the risk of comas. Avoid using.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Warfarin (Coumadin)

Caprylic acid might lower blood pressure. Taking caprylic acid along with medications for high blood pressure might cause your blood pressure to go too low.Some medications for high blood pressure include captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), losartan (Cozaar), valsartan (Diovan), diltiazem (Cardizem), amlodipine (Norvasc), hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDIURIL), furosemide (Lasix), and many others.Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to reduce pain and swelling. In the blood, NSAIDs bind to a protein called albumin. When bound to albumin, NSAIDs are not active. When displaced from albumin, NSAIDs are active. Caprylic acid can also bind to albumin. Taking caprylic acid along with NSAIDs might displace NSAIDs from albumin, increasing the amount that is active. This might increase the effects and side effects of NSAIDs.Some NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), aspirin, and others.In the blood, warfarin (Coumadin) binds to a protein called albumin. When bound to albumin, warfarin is not active. When displaced from albumin, warfarin (Coumadin) slows blood clotting. Like warfarin, caprylic acid binds to albumin. Taking caprylic acid along with warfarin might displace warfarin from albumin. This might increase the effects of warfarin and increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com