Chia

18/Description

About

When you hear "chia," you may think of "Chia Pets." These are clay figures sold in the US that support the growth of chia sprouts. But chia has a much longer history as a medicinal herb. It originated in Mexico and was cultivated by the Aztecs. Today, chia is grown commercially in Central America and South America. It is grown mainly for its seed, which is a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids.

People use chia seed for diabetes, improving exercise performance, high blood pressure, reducing the risk of heart disease, reducing a group of conditions that increase the risk of heart disease, and weight loss.).

Chia is applied to the skin for itchy skin (pruritus).

How it works

Chia seeds contain a large amount of healthy omega-3 fatty acids and dietary fiber. Researchers think omega-3 fatty acids and fiber help reduce risk factors for heart disease.

Effectiveness

Possibly Ineffective
Weight loss

Consuming chia seeds mixed with water twice daily before meals for 12 weeks does not improve body composition or reduce blood pressure in people who are overweight or obese. Also, eating milled or whole chia seeds daily for 10 weeks does not improve body composition or blood pressure in overweight women.

Concerns

Possibly safe

Chia is POSSIBLY SAFE Early research shows that applying lotion containing chia seed oil to the skin for 8 weeks reduces itching.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of chia duringpregnancyandbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Dosing considerations for Chia.

High blood fats called triglycerides: Blood contains several types of fat, including cholesterol and triglycerides. Triglyceride levels are too high in some people. Eating some types of chia can make them even higher. If you have high triglycerides, stick with using a specific variety of chia called Salba. Salba does not significantly increase triglyceride levels.

Prostate cancer: Chia contains a lot of alpha-linolenic acid. Some research suggests that large amounts of alpha-linolenic acid in the diet might increase the chance of getting prostate cancer. If you have prostate cancer or have a high risk of getting it, avoid eating large amounts of chia.

Interactions

No information available.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com