Chlorophyll

18/Description

About

Chlorophyll is a green pigment found in plants. Plants use chlorophyll and light to make food. People use chlorophyll as medicine. Common sources of chlorophyll used for medicine include alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and silkworm droppings.

Chlorophyll is used for bad breath and reducing colostomy odor. A colostomy is a surgical opening made in the abdomen that allows intestinal waste to be collected in a bag. Chlorophyll is also used for constipation, “detoxification,” and wound healing.

Healthcare providers use chlorophyll intravenously for treating a pancreas problem called chronic relapsing pancreatitis.

How it works

There isn't enough information available to know how chlorophyll might work.

Effectiveness

Possibly Effective
Swelling of the pancreas (pancreatitis)

Injecting chlorophyll intravenously (by IV) seems to help reduce pain and other symptoms in people with chronic relapsing pancreatitis.

Concerns

Likely safe

Chlorophyll is LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth

Possibly safe

It is POSSIBLY SAFE when injected intravenously (by IV) under the supervision of a trained medical professional or when applied to the skin.Chlorophyll can cause skin to become extra-sensitive to the sun. Wear sunblock outside, especially if you are light-skinned.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking chlorophyll if you arepregnantorbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Are there any interactions with medications?

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight (Photosensitizing drugs)

Some medications can increase sensitivity to sunlight. Chlorophyll might also increase your sensitivity to sunlight. Taking chlorophyll along with medication that increases sensitivity to sunlight could increase the chances of sunburn, blistering, or rashes on areas of skin exposed to sunlight. Be sure to wear sunblock and protective clothing when spending time in the sun.Some drugs that cause photosensitivity include amitriptyline (Elavil), Ciprofloxacin (Cipro), norfloxacin (Noroxin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), ofloxacin (Floxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), gatifloxacin (Tequin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Septra), tetracycline, methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen, 8-MOP, Oxsoralen), and Trioxsalen (Trisoralen).

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional.