Chymotrypsin

18/Description

About

Chymotrypsin is an enzyme. An enzyme is a substance that speeds up certain chemical reactions in the body. People use chymotrypsin to make medicine.

People take chymotrypsin by mouth or as a shot to reduce redness and swelling associated with pockets of infection (abscesses), ulcers, surgery, or traumatic injuries; and to help loosen phlegm in asthma, bronchitis, lung diseases, and sinus infections.

It is also taken by mouth to reduce liver damage in burn patients; and to assist in wound repair.

Chymotrypsin is sometimes breathed in (inhaled) or applied to the skin (used topically) for conditions that involve pain and swelling (inflammation) and for infections.

During cataract surgery, chymotrypsin is sometimes used to reduce damage to the eye.

How it works

Chymotrypsin has ingredients that reduce swelling (inflammation) and tissue destruction.

Effectiveness

Effective
Cataract surgery, when used by a healthcare professional

Concerns

Chymotrypsin is safe when used in the eye by a healthcare professional. Chymotrypsin can cause side effects when used in the eye, including an increase in pressure in the eye and other eye conditions such as uveitis, paralysis of the iris, and keratitis.It also seems to be safe for most people when taken by mouth to reduce redness and swelling following surgery or injury, and when applied directly to the skin for burns.Not enough is known about the safety of chymotrypsin for its other uses.Rarely, chymotrypsin might cause an allergic reaction when taken by mouth. Symptoms include itching, shortness of breath, swelling of the lips or throat, shock, loss of consciousness, and death.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of chymotrypsin duringpregnancyandbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Dosing considerations for Chymotrypsin.

Interactions

No information available.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com