Coriander

18/Description

About

Coriander is a plant. Both the leaves and fruit (seeds) of coriander are used as food and medicine. However, the term "coriander" is typically used to refer to the fruit. Coriander leaves are usually referred to as cilantro. In the following sections, the term "coriander" will be used to describe the fruit.

Coriander is taken by mouth for stomach and intestinal problems including upset stomach, nausea, diarrhea, intestinal gas, constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is also taken by mouth for convulsions, insomnia, anxiety, and to treat infections caused by bacteria and fungus. Coriander is also taken by mouth for diabetes, worms, and joint pain and swelling.

Some breast-feeding women use coriander to increase milk flow.

In foods, coriander is used as a culinary spice and to prevent food poisoning.

In manufacturing, coriander is used as a flavoring agent in medicines and tobacco and as a fragrance in cosmetics and soaps.

How it works

Coriander might stimulate the gut and increase the production of stomach acid. This might help people with conditions such as indigestion, constipation, or intestinal gas. Coriander my also reduce muscle spasms in the gut. This might help treat stomach conditions such as diarrhea. Coriander may also lower blood sugar by stimulating insulin production. Coriander may also lower blood pressure by causing blood vessels to dilate and working like a "water pill" (diuretic).

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Constipation

Early research suggests that drinking a specific tea containing fennel, senna, licorice, orange peel, cassia cinnamon, coriander, and ginger (Smooth Move by Traditional Medicinals) for one month can reduce constipation in older people.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Early research shows that taking 30 drops of a product containing lemon balm, spearmint, and coriander (Carmint, Pour Sina) three times per day after meals for 8 weeks reduces stomach pain and discomfort in people with IBS when used along with diarrhea medicine (loperamide) or psyllium.

Anxiety.
Bacterial or fungal infections
Convulsions
Diabetes
Insomnia
Intestinal gas (flatulence)
Joint pain and swelling
Nausea and diarrhea
Stomach upset
Nausea
Worms
Other conditions

Concerns

Possibly safe

Coriander is LIKELY SAFE in food amounts and POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth in appropriate medicinal amounts.When taken by mouth or inhaled, coriander can cause allergic reactions. Symptoms of such reactions can include asthma, nasal swelling, hives, or swelling inside the mouth. These reactions appear to be most common in people who work with spices in the food industry.When coriander comes in contact with the skin, it can cause skin irritation and inflammation.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking coriander if you arepregnantor breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Allergies. People who are allergic to mugwort, aniseed, caraway, fennel, dill, or similar plants might have allergic reactions to coriander.

Diabetes. Coriander might lower blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes and take coriander, monitor your blood sugar levels closely.

Low blood pressure: Coriander might decrease blood pressure. This could cause blood pressure to go to low in people with low blood pressure. Use cautiously if you have low blood pressure or take medications to lower your blood pressure.

Surgery: Coriander might lower blood sugar. There is some concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during surgery. Stop using coriander at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Sedative medications (CNS depressants)

Coriander might lower blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking coriander in medicinal amounts along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.Coriander might decrease blood pressure. Taking coriander in medicinal amounts along with medications for high blood pressure might cause your blood pressure to go too low.Some medications for high blood pressure include captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), losartan (Cozaar), valsartan (Diovan), diltiazem (Cardizem), Amlodipine (Norvasc), hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDiuril), furosemide (Lasix), and many others.Coriander might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness are called sedatives. Using coriander in medicinal amounts along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness.Some sedative medications include clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), phenobarbital (Donnatal), zolpidem (Ambien), and many others.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional.