Dill

18/Description

About

Dill is a plant that has a long history as a culinary spice. But it has also been used as a magic weapon and a medicine. During the Middle Ages, people used dill to defend against witchcraft and enchantments. More recently, people have used dill seeds and the parts of the plant that grow above the ground as medicine.

Dill is used for digestion problems including loss of appetite, intestinal gas (flatulence), liver problems, and gallbladder complaints. It is also used for urinary tract disorders including kidney disease and painful or difficult urination.

Other uses for dill include treatment of fever and colds, cough, bronchitis, hemorrhoids, infections, spasms, nerve pain, genital ulcers, menstrual cramps, and sleep disorders.

Dill seed is sometimes applied to the mouth and throat for pain and swelling (inflammation).

In foods, dill is used as a culinary spice.

In manufacturing, dill oil is used as a fragrance in cosmetics, soaps, and perfumes.

How it works

Some chemicals contained in dill seed might help relax muscles. Other chemicals might be able to fight bacteria and increase urine production like a “water pill.”

Effectiveness

Not Proven
High cholesterol

Early research suggests that taking dill tablets by mouth for 6 weeks while following a cholesterol-lowering diet does not lower cholesterol or blood fats called triglycerides in people with high cholesterol and clogged heart arteries (coronary artery disease, CAD).

Loss of appetite
Infections
Digestive tract problems
Urinary tract problems
Spasms
Intestinal gas (flatulence)
Sleep disorders
Fever
Colds
Cough
Bronchitis
Liver problems
Gallbladder problems
Sore mouth and throat
Other conditions

Concerns

Likely safe

Dill is LIKELY SAFE when consumed as a food

Possibly safe

Dill is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth as a medicine.When applied to the skin, dill can sometimes cause skin irritation. Fresh dill juice can also cause the skin to become extra sensitive to the sun. This might put you at greater risk for sunburns and skin cancer. Avoid sunlight. Wear sunblock and protective clothing outside, especially if you are light-skinned.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It'sPOSSIBLY UNSAFEto use dill as a medicine if you arepregnant. Dill seed can startmenstruationand that might lead to amiscarriage.Are there any interactions with medications?

There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking dill as a medicine if you are breast-feeding. It's best to stick to food amounts.

Allergy to plants in the carrot family: Dill may cause allergic reactions in people who are allergic to plants in the carrot family. Some of these include asafoetida, caraway, celery, coriander, and fennel.

Diabetes: Dill extract might lower blood sugar in people with diabetes. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully, if you have diabetes and use dill extract in amounts larger than the amounts normally found in food.

Surgery: Dill extract might lower blood sugar. There is concern that using dill extract might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop taking dill extract at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Lithium

Dill might have an effect like a water pill or "diuretic." Taking dill might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)

Dill extract might lower blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking dill extract along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, metformin (Glucophage), pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com