Forsythia

18/Description

About

Forsythia is a plant. The fruit is used for medicine.

Forsythia is used for swelling of small air passages in the lung (bronchiolitis), tonsillitis, sore throat, fever, vomiting, heart disease, HIV/AIDS, gonorrhea, pain and swelling (inflammation), and a severe skin rash with fever and vomiting caused by a bacterium (erysipelas).

Sometimes forsythia is given intravenously (by IV) in combination with other herbs for treating bronchiolitis.

How it works

Forsythia might decrease inflammation. However, more information is needed to determine how forsythia might work.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Inflammation of small air passages in the lung (bronchiolitis).

Inflammation of small air passages in the lung (bronchiolitis). Developing research suggests that children with bronchiolitis due to a particular infection (respiratory syncytial virus infection) get over their symptoms faster when given a combination of forsythia, honeysuckle, and Baikal skullcap intravenously (by IV).

Tonsillitis
Sore throat
Fever
Gonorrhea
Pain and swelling (inflammation)
Other conditions

Concerns

It is not known if forsythia is safe when taken by mouth. There is some information that an injectable form might be safe when used in children.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of forsythia duringpregnancyandbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Are there any interactions with medications?

Surgery: Because forsythia might slow blood clotting, there is a concern that it might cause extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking forsythia at least two weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)

Forsythia might slow blood clotting. Taking forsythia along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional.