Glycerol

18/Description

About

Glycerol is a naturally occurring chemical. People use it as a medicine. Some uses and dosage forms have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Glycerol is taken by mouth for weight loss, improving exercise performance, helping the body replace water lost during diarrhea and vomiting, and reducing pressure inside the eye in people with glaucoma. Athletes also use glycerol to keep from becoming dehydrated.

Healthcare providers sometimes give glycerol intravenously (by IV) to reduce pressure inside the brain in various conditions including stroke, meningitis, encephalitis, Reye's syndrome, pseudotumor cerebri, central nervous system (CNS) trauma, and CNS tumors; for reducing brain volume for neurosurgical procedures; and for treating fainting on standing due to poor blood flow to the brain (postural syncope).

Some people apply glycerol to the skin as a moisturizer.

Eye doctors sometimes put a solution that contains glycerol in the eye to reduce fluid in the cornea before an eye exam.

Rectally, glycerol is used as a laxative.

Glycerol is also a type of additive that can be added to supplements in the manufacturing process.

How it works

Glycerol attracts water into the gut, softening stools and relieving constipation.

Effectiveness

Likely Effective
Constipation, when used rectally as a suppository

Concerns

Glycerol seems to be safe for most adults. When taken by mouth, glycerol can cause side effects including headaches, dizziness, bloating, nausea, vomiting, thirst, and diarrhea.Glycerol may not be safe when injected intravenously (by IV). Red blood cells might get seriously damaged.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of glycerol duringpregnancyandbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Dosing considerations for Glycerol.

Interactions

No information available.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com