Goat's Rue

18/Description

About

Goat's rue is a plant. The parts that grow above the ground are used to make medicine. Be careful not to confuse goat's rue (Galega officinalis) with rue (Ruta graveolens).

Goat's rue is used along with conventional treatment for diabetes and as a diuretic.

In combination with other herbs, goat's rue is used to stimulate the adrenal gland and pancreas; to protect the liver; for digestion problems; and to start the flow of breast milk. Some people use herbal combinations that include goat's rue as a tonic and for “blood purification.”

How it works

Goat's rue contains a chemical that may lower blood sugar in a test tube. But it is unclear if goat's rue has this effect when taken by people.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Diabetes
Blood purification

“”

Digestive problems
Other uses

Concerns

There isn't enough information to know whether goat's rue is safe. No harmful effects have been reported in humans, but fatal poisoning has occurred in grazing animals that ate large quantities of goat's rue.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking goat's rue if you arepregnantorbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Are there any interactions with medications?

Bleeding conditions: Goat's rue might slow blood clotting and increase the risk of bleeding. In theory, goat's rue might make bleeding disorders worse.

Diabetes: Goat's rue might lower blood sugar levels in some people. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use goat's rue.

Surgery: Goat's rue might affect blood sugar levels. There is concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop using goat's rue at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)

Goat's rue might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking goat's rue along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.Goat's rue might slow blood clotting. Taking goat's rue along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, ticlopidine (Ticlid), warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional.