Honeysuckle

18/Description

About

Honeysuckle is a plant that is sometimes called “woodbine.” The flower, seed, and leaves are used for medicine. Be careful not to confuse honeysuckle with other plants that are also known as woodbine, such as American ivy, gelsemium, and Clematis virginiana.

Honeysuckle is used for digestive disorders including pain and swelling (inflammation) of the small intestine (enteritis) and dysentery; upper respiratory tract infections including colds, influenza, swine flu, and pneumonia; other viral and bacterial infections; swelling of the brain (encephalitis); fever; boils; and sores. Honeysuckle is also used for urinary disorders, headache, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. Some people use it to promote sweating, as a laxative, to counteract poisoning, and for birth control.

Honeysuckle is sometimes applied to the skin for inflammation and itching, and to kill germs.

How it works

Honeysuckle might decrease inflammation. However, more information is needed to determine how honeysuckle might work.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Swelling (inflammation) of small air passages in the lung (bronchiolitis)

Early research suggests a combination of honeysuckle, Baikal skullcap, and forsythia given by IV (intravenously) by a healthcare provider might shorten the length of symptoms of bronchiolitis in children with respiratory syncytial virus infection.

Digestive disorders
Cancerous tumors
Constipation
Skin inflammation
Itching
Colds
Fever
Swelling
Boils
Sores
Bacterial or viral infections
Promoting sweating
Other conditions

Concerns

It is not known if honeysuckle, in general, is safe. However, an intravenous preparation that includes honeysuckle and two other herbs has been used safely in children for up to 7 days.Skin contact with honeysuckle can cause rash in allergic people.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of honeysuckle duringpregnancyandbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Surgery: Honeysuckle might slow blood clotting, so there is concern that it might increase the risk of extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using honeysuckle at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)

Honeysuckle might slow blood clotting. Taking honeysuckle along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com