Ipriflavone

18/Description

About

Ipriflavone is made in the laboratory from another substance (daidzein) that is taken from soy. Soy is a plant.

Ipriflavone is used for preventing and treating weak bones (osteoporosis) in older women, preventing osteoporosis caused by certain medications, relieving pain associated with osteoporosis, and treating a bone disease called Paget's disease. It is also used for reducing bone loss caused by chronic kidney disease (renal osteodystrophy) and by paralysis associated with stroke. Researchers have found that paralyzed stroke patients have weaker bones on the affected side, possibly due to immobility as well as vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency may stem from lack of exposure to sunlight.

Ipriflavone is also used by bodybuilders to increase metabolism.

How it works

Ipriflavone may prevent bone strength loss, and help improve the effects of estrogen in preventing osteoporosis. When used in combination with estrogens, it might allow lower estrogen doses to be used in postmenopausal women.

Effectiveness

Likely Effective
Treating and preventing weak bones (osteoporosis) in postmenopausal women

Taking ipriflavone in combination with 1000 mg of calcium daily can prevent loss of bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis or low bone strength. There is some evidence that it might actually increase bone strength in some of these women. The effect seems to be determined by the amount of calcium that is taken along with the ipriflavone. One study using ipriflavone with only 500 mg per day of calcium found no effect on bone strength. But taking more than 1000 mg of calcium daily may increase the benefit.Taking ipriflavone in combination with estrogen also seems to prevent osteoporosis and increase bone strength in older women. Adding calcium makes the combination work even better.

Reducing pain associated with osteoporosis

Ipriflavone can also significantly reduce pain due to osteoporosis and seems to be as effective as inhaling a medication called calcitonin.

Reducing bone loss in people who have been paralyzed on one side of their body by stroke (hemiplegic stroke)

Ipriflavone in combination with vitamin D seems to prevent bone loss significantly better than vitamin D alone in hemiplegic stroke patients with vitamin D deficiency.

Concerns

Likely safe

Ipriflavone is LIKELY SAFE for most people when used with proper medical supervision. It can cause side effects such as stomach pain, diarrhea, or dizziness.There is some concern that ipriflavone can cause a decreased white cell count (lymphocytopenia) in people taking it for greater than six months. White cell counts should be monitored, especially in people taking ipriflavone long-term.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of ipriflavone duringpregnancyandbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Weak immune system: Ipriflavone can lower the body's white cell count, making it more difficult for the body to fight off infection. This is especially concerning in people who already have a weak immune system due to AIDS, drugs used to prevent organ rejection after transplant, chemotherapy, or other causes. If you have a weak immune system, check with your healthcare provider before starting ipriflavone.

Low white cell count (lymphocytopenia): Since ipriflavone can cause lymphocytopenia, there is a concern that it might make pre-existing lymphocytopenia worse.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Theophylline

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Ipriflavone might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking ipriflavone along with some medications that are changed by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking ipriflavone, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.Some of these medications that are changed by the liver include clozapine (Clozaril), cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril), fluvoxamine (Luvox), haloperidol (Haldol), imipramine (Tofranil), mexiletine (Mexitil), olanzapine (Zyprexa), pentazocine (Talwin), propranolol (Inderal), tacrine (Cognex), theophylline, zileuton (Zyflo), zolmitriptan (Zomig), and others.Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Ipriflavone might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking ipriflavone along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking ipriflavone, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.Some medications that are changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), diazepam (Valium), zileuton (Zyflo), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Voltaren), fluvastatin (Lescol), glipizide (Glucotrol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), irbesartan (Avapro), losartan (Cozaar), phenytoin (Dilantin), piroxicam (Feldene), tamoxifen (Nolvadex), tolbutamide (Tolinase), torsemide (Demadex), warfarin (Coumadin), and others.Ipriflavone might decrease the immune system. Taking ipriflavone along with other medications that decrease the immune system might decrease the immune system too much. Avoid taking ipriflavone with medications that decrease the immune system.Some medications that decrease the immune system include azathioprine (Imuran), basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), daclizumab (Zenapax), muromonab-CD3 (OKT3, Orthoclone OKT3), mycophenolate (CellCept), tacrolimus (FK506, Prograf), sirolimus (Rapamune), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), corticosteroids (glucocorticoids), and others.The body breaks down theophylline to get rid of it. Ipriflavone might decrease how quickly the body gets rid of theophylline. Taking ipriflavone along with theophylline might increase the effects and side effects of theophylline.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com