Kombucha Tea

18/Description

About

Kombucha is a type of yeast, although it is sometimes described incorrectly as a mushroom. Kombucha tea is made by fermenting kombucha and bacteria with black tea, sugar, and other ingredients. People use kombucha tea as medicine, but there is no scientific evidence that it is an effective treatment for any condition.

Kombucha tea is used for memory loss, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), joint pain (rheumatism), aging, loss of appetite, AIDS, cancer, high blood pressure, constipation, arthritis, and hair regrowth. It is also used for increasing white cell (T-cell) counts, boosting the immune system, and strengthening the metabolism.

Some people apply kombucha tea directly to the skin for pain.

How it works

Kombucha tea contains alcohol, vinegar, B vitamins, caffeine, sugar, and other substances. However, there isn't enough evidence to know how kombucha tea might work for medicinal uses.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Memory loss
Premenstrual syndrome (PMS)
Joint pain (rheumatism)
Aging
Loss of appetite
AIDS
Cancer
High blood pressure
Increasing white cell (T-cell) counts
Strengthening the immune system and metabolism
Constipation
Arthritis
Hair growth
Pain, when applied to the skin
Other conditions

Concerns

Possibly unsafe

Kombucha tea is POSSIBLY UNSAFE for most adults when taken by mouth. It can cause side effects including stomach problems, yeast infections, allergic reactions, yellow skin (jaundice), nausea, vomiting, head and neck pain, and death.Kombucha tea, especially batches made at home where it's hard to maintain a germ-free environment, can become contaminated with fungus (Aspergillus) and bacteria (including anthrax). In Iran, 20 people got anthrax infections from taking kombucha tea

Likely unsafe

This tea is LIKELY UNSAFE in people with weakened immune systems, such as people with HIV/AIDS, who are more likely to get infections, as well as when it is prepared in a lead-glazed ceramic pot. Lead poisoning has been reported following ingestion of kombucha tea.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Kombucha tea isPOSSIBLY UNSAFEduringpregnancyandbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Alcoholism: Kombucha tea contains alcohol. Avoid it if you have a drinking problem.

Diabetes: Kombucha tea might affect blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use kombucha tea.

Diarrhea: Kombucha tea contains caffeine. The caffeine in kombucha tea, especially when taken in large amounts, can worsen diarrhea.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): Kombucha tea contains caffeine. The caffeine in kombucha tea, especially when taken in large amounts, can worsen diarrhea and might worsen symptoms of IBS.

Surgery: Since kombucha tea seems to affect blood glucose levels, there is a concern that it might interfere with blood glucose control during and after surgery. Stop using kombucha tea at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Weak immune system: Don't use kombucha tea if you have a weakened immune system due to HIV/AIDS or other causes. Kombucha tea can support the growth of bacteria and fungus that can cause serious infections.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Minor
Disulfiram (Antabuse)

Kombucha tea might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking kombucha tea along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (Diabeta, Glynase PresTabs, Micronase), insulin, metformin (Glucophage), pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), and others.Kombucha tea contains alcohol. The body breaks down alcohol to get rid of it. Disulfiram (Antabuse) decreases the break-down of alcohol. Taking kombucha tea along with disulfiram (Antabuse) can cause a pounding headache, vomiting, flushing, and other unpleasant reactions. Don't drink any alcohol if you are taking disulfiram (Antabuse).

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com