Lemongrass

18/Description

About

Lemongrass is a plant. The leaves and the oil are used to make medicine.

Lemongrass is used for treating digestive tract spasms, stomachache, high blood pressure, convulsions, pain, vomiting, cough, achy joints (rheumatism), fever, the common cold, and exhaustion. It is also used to kill germs and as a mild astringent.

Some people apply lemongrass and its essential oil directly to the skin for headache, stomachache, abdominal pain, and muscle pain.

By inhalation, the essential oil of lemongrass is used as aromatherapy for muscle pain.

In food and beverages, lemongrass is used as a flavoring. For example, lemongrass leaves are commonly used as “lemon” flavoring in herbal teas.

In manufacturing, lemongrass is used as a fragrance in soaps and cosmetics. Lemongrass is also used in making vitamin A and natural citral.

How it works

Lemongrass might help prevent the growth of some bacteria and yeast. Lemongrass also contains substances that are thought to relieve pain, reduce fever, stimulate the uterus and menstrual flow, and have antioxidant properties.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
High cholesterol

Early research suggests that taking lemongrass oil by mouth for 90 days does not reduce cholesterol levels in people with high cholesterol.

Yeast infection in the mouth (thrush)

Early research suggests that drinking a lemongrass infusion for 10 days decreases thrush symptoms in people with HIV/AIDS better than applying a solution of gentian violet to the affected area.

Stomach and intestinal spasms
Stomach ache
High blood pressure
Convulsions
Pain
Vomiting
Cough
Achy joints (rheumatism)
Fever
Common cold
Exhaustion
Headache
Use as an antiseptic and astringent
Other conditions

Concerns

Likely safe

Lemongrass is LIKELY SAFE for most people when used in food amounts

Possibly safe

It is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth or applied to the skin short-term for medicinal purposes. However, there have been some toxic side effects, such as lung problems after inhaling lemongrass and a fatal poisoning after a child swallowed a lemongrass oil-based insect repellent.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It isLIKELY UNSAFEto take lemongrass by mouth duringpregnancy. Lemongrass seems to be able to start menstrual flow, so there is a concern that it might cause amiscarriage.Dosing considerations for Lemongrass.

There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking lemongrass if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

No information available.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional.