Limonene

18/Description

About

Limonene is a chemical found in the peels of citrus fruits and in other plants. It is used to make medicine.

Limonene is used to promote weight loss, prevent cancer, treat cancer, and treat bronchitis.

In foods, beverages, and chewing gum, limonene is used as a flavoring.

In pharmaceuticals, limonene is added to help medicinal ointments and creams penetrate the skin.

In manufacturing, limonene is used as a fragrance, cleaner (solvent), and as an ingredient in water-free hand cleansers.

How it works

Limonene may block cancer-forming chemicals and kill cancer cells in the laboratory. But more research is needed to know if this occurs in humans.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Cancer treatment

One form of limonene (D-limonene) seems to build up in tumors in people with advanced cancer, when it is taken by mouth in 21-day cycles. The high levels of limonene in the tumors may slow down the progress of the cancer, but their effect on the person's survival is uncertain.

Cancer prevention
Weight loss
Bronchitis
Other conditions

Concerns

Limonene is safe in food amounts. It also appears to be safe for most people in medicinal amounts when taken by mouth for up to one year.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Limonene is safe in food amounts, but there's not enough information to know if it's safe in larger medicinal amounts. Stay on the safe side and avoid using limonene as a medicine until more is known.Are there any interactions with medications?

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Medications that increase the breakdown of other medications by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C9 [CYP2C9] inducers)

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Limonene might increase how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking limonene along with some medications that are changed by the liver can lead to a variety of effects and side effects. Before taking limonene talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.Some of these medications that are changed by the liver include diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), ibuprofen (Motrin), meloxicam (Mobic), and piroxicam (Feldene), amitriptyline (Elavil), warfarin (Coumadin), glipizide (Glucotrol), losartan (Cozaar), and others.Limonene might be broken down by the liver. Taking limonene along with medications that decrease the break down of limonene in the liver might increase the effects and side effects of limonene.Some medications that might decrease the breakdown of limonene in the liver include cimetidine (Tagamet), fluvoxamine (Luvox), omeprazole (Prilosec); ticlopidine (Ticlid), topiramate (Topamax), and others.Limonene might be broken down by the liver. Taking limonene along with medications that decrease the break down of limonene in the liver might increase the effects and side effects of limonene.Some medications that might decrease the breakdown of limonene in the liver include amiodarone (Cordarone), fluconazole (Diflucan), lovastatin (Mevacor), paroxetine (Paxil), zafirlukast (Accolate), and many others.Limonene might be broken down by the liver. Taking limonene along with medications that increase the breakdown of limonene in the liver might decrease the effects of limonene.Some medications that might increase the breakdown of limonene in the liver include carbamazepine (Tegretol), prednisone (Deltasone), and rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane).Limonene might be broken down by the liver. Taking limonene along with medications that increase the breakdown of limonene in the liver might decrease the effects of limonene.Some medications that might increase the breakdown of limonene in the liver include rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane) and secobarbital (Seconal).

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional.