Methoxylated Flavones

18/Description

About

Flavonoids are pigments found in plants. They are responsible for many of the yellow, red, and orange colors in plants.

Over 4000 different flavonoids have been identified from various plant sources. Common food sources include red wine, stems, flowers, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, herbs, spices, coffee, and teas.

In 1936, some scientists suggested that flavonoids be recognized as vitamins. They believed that flavonoids were necessary to protect the health of capillaries, the smallest blood vessels. But there wasn't enough evidence to justify classifying flavonoids as vitamins.

Flavonoids are divided into groups based on slight differences in chemical structure. Flavones are one of the groups. Methoxylated flavones are a subdivision of that group. Methoxylated flavones are found in especially large amounts in citrus fruits.

Methoxylated flavones are used for poor circulation in the legs (venous insufficiency), varicose veins, heart disease, high cholesterol, cataracts, and cancer.

How it works

Methoxylated flavones are natural antioxidants and might reduce inflammation (swelling). They might also affect the way the liver processes cholesterol and other blood fats. Scientists think methoxylated flavones might also reduce the spread of cancer cells. But more information is needed.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Poor circulation in the legs (venous insufficiency)
Varicose veins
Heart disease
High cholesterol
Cataracts
Cancer
Other conditions

Concerns

Methoxylated flavones are a normal part of the diet. They are safe when consumed as part of food. But there isn't enough information available to know if supplements containing methoxylated flavones are safe.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Methoxylated flavones are safe forpregnantandbreast-feeding women when used as part of the diet. But the safety of methoxylated flavones duringpregnancyand breast-feeding is not known when used in amounts greater than those commonly found in foods. It's best to stay on the safe side and limit intake to food amounts.

Surgery: Methoxylated flavones can slow blood clotting. There is some concern that they might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking methoxylated flavones supplements at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Methoxylated flavones might increase how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking methoxylated flavones along with some medications that are changed by the liver might decrease the effects of some medications. Before taking methoxylated flavones, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.Some of these medications that are changed by the liver include clozapine (Clozaril), cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril), fluvoxamine (Luvox), haloperidol (Haldol), imipramine (Tofranil), mexiletine (Mexitil), olanzapine (Zyprexa), pentazocine (Talwin), propranolol (Inderal), tacrine (Cognex), theophylline, zileuton (Zyflo), zolmitriptan (Zomig), and others.Some medications are moved by pumps in cells. Some methoxylated flavones might change how these pumps work and increase how much of some medications get absorbed by the body.Some medications that are moved by these pumps include etoposide, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, vindesine, ketoconazole, itraconazole, amprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, cimetidine, ranitidine, diltiazem, verapamil, corticosteroids, erythromycin, cisapride (Propulsid), fexofenadine (Allegra), cyclosporine, loperamide (Imodium), quinidine, and others.Some methoxylated flavones might slow blood clotting. Taking methoxylated flavones along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com