Parsley

Botanicals

18/Description

About

Parsley is an herb. The leaf, seed, and root are used to make medicine. Be careful not to confuse parsley with fool's parsley and parsley piert.

Parsley is used for urinary tract infections (UTIs), kidney stones (nephrolithiasis), gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, constipation, jaundice, intestinal gas (flatulence), indigestion, colic, diabetes, cough, asthma, fluid retention (edema), osteoarthritis, “tired blood” (anemia), high blood pressure, prostate conditions, and spleen conditions. It is also used to start menstrual flow, to cause an abortion, as an aphrodisiac, and as a breath freshener.

Some people apply parsley directly to the skin for cracked or chapped skin, bruises, tumors, insect bites, lice, parasites, and to stimulate hair growth.

In foods and beverages, parsley is widely used as a garnish, condiment, food, and flavoring.

In manufacturing, parsley seed oil is used as a fragrance in soaps, cosmetics, and perfumes.

How it works

Parsley might help stimulate the appetite, improve digestion, increase urine production, reduce spasms, and increase menstrual flow.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Kidney stones
Urinary tract infections (UTIs)
Cracked or chapped skin
Bruises
Tumors
Insect bites
Digestive problems
Menstrual problems
Liver disorders
Asthma
Cough
Fluid retention and swelling (edema)
Other conditions

Concerns

Likely safe

Parsley is LIKELY SAFE when consumed in amounts commonly found in food

Possibly safe

Parsley is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth as medicine, short-term. In some people, parsley can cause allergic skin reactions

Likely unsafe

Consuming very large amounts of parsley is LIKELY UNSAFE, as this can cause other side effects like “tired blood” (anemia) and liver or kidney problems.Also, parsley seed oil applied to the skin is LIKELY UNSAFE as it can cause the skin to become extra sensitive to the sun and cause a rash. Not enough is known about the safety of applying parsley root and leaf to the skin.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Parsley in food amounts is fine, but parsley in larger medicinal amounts isLIKELY UNSAFEwhen taken by mouth duringpregnancy. Parsley has been used to cause an abortion and to start menstrual flow. In addition, developing evidence suggests that takingAn-Tai-Yin, anherbalcombination product containing parsley anddong quai, during the first three months of pregnancy increases the risk of serious birth defects. If you arepregnant, stick with using only the amount of parsley typically found in food.

Not enough is known about the safety of using parsley in medicinal amounts during breast-feeding. It's best not to use more than typical food amounts of parsley.

Diabetes: Parsley might lower blood sugar levels. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use parsley.

Fluid retention (edema): There is a concern that parsley might cause the body to hold onto sodium (salt), and this increases water retention.

High blood pressure: There is a concern that parsley might cause the body to hold onto sodium (salt), and this could make high blood pressure worse.

Kidney disease: Don't take parsley if you have kidney disease. Parsley contains chemicals that can make kidney disease worse.

Surgery: Parsley might lower blood glucose levels and could interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgical procedures. Stop using parsley at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)

Parsley might lower blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking medicinal amounts of parsley along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medications might need to be changed. Some medications for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), and others.

Pentobarbital (Nembutal)

Parsley juice might increase the amount of time pentobarbital stays in the body. Taking parsley along with pentobarbital might increase the effects and side effects from pentobarbital.

Warfarin (Coumadin)

Warfarin (Coumadin) is taken to thin the blood and slow blood clotting. Large amounts of parsley leaf might increase blood clotting. Taking parsley along with warfarin might decrease how well warfarin (Coumadin) works to thin the blood.

Minor
Aspirin

Parsley seems to work like a "water pill" by causing the body to lose water. Taking parsley along with other "water pills" might cause the body to lose too much water. Losing too much water can cause you to be dizzy and your blood pressure to go too low.Some "water pills" include chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Thalitone), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Microzide), and others.Some people are allergic to parsley. Aspirin might increase your sensitivity to parsley if you are allergic to parsley. This has only been reported in one person. But to be on the safe side, if you are allergic to parsley do not take aspirin and eat parsley.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional.