Phosphatidylserine

Botanicals

18/Description

About

Phosphatidylserine is a chemical. The body can make phosphatidylserine, but gets most of what it needs from foods. Phosphatidylserine supplements were once made from cow brains, but now are commonly manufactured from cabbage or soy. The switch was triggered by a concern that products made from animal sources might cause infections such as mad cow disease.

Phosphatidylserine is used for Alzheimer's disease, age-related decline in mental function, improving thinking skills in young people, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, preventing exercise-induced stress, and improving athletic performance.

How it works

Phosphatidylserine is an important chemical with widespread functions in the body. It is part of the cell structure and is key in the maintenance of cellular function, especially in the brain.

Effectiveness

Possibly Effective
Age-related mental decline

Phosphatidylserine made from cow brains seems to improve attention, language skills, and memory in aging people with declining thinking skills. It is not known whether the newer products, which are made from soy and cabbage, will have the same benefit. However, there is developing evidence that plant-derived phosphatidylserine improves memory in people with age-associated memory loss.

Alzheimer's disease

Taking phosphatidylserine can improve some of the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease after 6-12 weeks of treatment. It seems to be most effective in people with less severe symptoms. However, phosphatidylserine might lose its effectiveness with extended use. After 16 weeks of treatment, progression of Alzheimer's disease seems to overcome any benefit provided by phosphatidylserine.Most clinical studies have used phosphatidylserine from cow brains. However, most supplements now use phosphatidylserine from soy or cabbage. Researchers do not yet know how phosphatidylserine made from these plant sources compares with phosphatidylserine made from cow brains in terms of effectiveness for Alzheimer's disease.

Concerns

Possibly safe

Phosphatidylserine is POSSIBLY SAFE most adults and children when taken by mouth appropriately. It has been used in research studies for up to six months. Phosphatidylserine can cause side effects including insomnia and stomach upset, particularly at doses over 300 mg.There is some concern that products made from animal sources could transmit diseases, such as mad cow disease. To date, there are not any known cases of humans getting animal diseases from phosphatidylserine supplements, but look for supplements made from plants to be on the safe side.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking phosphatidylserine if you arepregnantorbreast feeding. Be on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Various medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, and other conditions (Cholinergic drugs)

Some drying medications are called anticholinergic drugs. Phosphatidylserine might increase chemicals that can decrease the effects of these drying medications.Some drying medications include atropine, scopolamine, and some medications used for allergies (antihistamines) and for depression (antidepressants).Phosphatidylserine might increase a chemical in the body called acetylcholine. Medications for Alzheimer's disease called acetylcholinesterase inhibitors also increase the chemical acetylcholine. Taking phosphatidylserine along with medications for Alzheimer's disease might increase effects and side effects of medications for Alzheimer's disease.Some acetylcholinesterase medications include donepezil (Aricept), tacrine (Cognex), rivastigmine (Exelon), and galantamine (Reminyl, Razadyne).Phosphatidylserine might increase a chemical in the body called acetylcholine. This chemical is similar to some medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, and other conditions. Taking phosphatidylserine with these medications might increase the chance of side effects.Some of these medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, and other conditions include pilocarpine (Pilocar and others) and others.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com