Purple Nut Sedge

18/Description

About

Purple nut sedge is a plant that resembles grass. The tubers and above-ground parts are used to make medicine.

People take purple nut sedge by mouth for dental cavities, depression, diabetes, diarrhea, fever, indigestion, itchy skin, malaria, muscle spasms, menstrual problems, nausea, pain, snake bites, stomach disorders including irritable bowel syndrome, vomiting, weight loss, to cause sleepiness, to reduce swelling, to improve blood circulation, and as an antioxidant.

People apply purple nut sedge to the skin for acne, dandruff, skin wounds, and skin ulcers.

In foods, purple nut sedge is eaten as a source of starch.

How it works

Purple nut sedge is an antioxidant. It might reduce blood sugar and prevent the growth of certain bacteria, including the type that causes dental cavities. Purple nut sedge might also help break down fat to increase weight loss.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Acne

Acne

Dandruff
Dental cavities
Depression
Diabetes
Diarrhea
Fever
Indigestion
Itchy skin
Malaria
Menstrual problems
Muscle spasms
Nausea
Pain
Skin wounds
Skin ulcers
Snake bites
Stomach disorders
Vomiting
Weight loss
Other conditions

Concerns

It isn't known if purple nut sedge is safe or what the possible side effects might be.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of purple nut sedge duringpregnancyandbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorders: Purple nut sedge might slow blood clotting. This might increase the risk of bruising or bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Slow heart rate (bradycardia): Purple nut sedge might slow down the heartbeat. This could be a problem in people who already have a slow heart rate.

Diabetes: Purple nut sedge might lower blood sugar levels. People with diabetes should monitor their blood glucose levels closely. If you have diabetes, it's best to check with your healthcare provider before starting purple nut sedge.

Gastrointestinal tract blockage: Purple nut sedge might cause “congestion” in the intestines. This might cause problems in people who have a blockage in their intestines.

Stomach ulcers: Purple nut sedge might increase secretions in the stomach and intestines. There is concern that this could worsen ulcers.

Lung conditions: Purple nut sedge might increase fluid secretions in the lung. There is concern that this could worsen lung conditions such as asthma or emphysema.

Seizures: There is concern that purple nut sedge might increase the risk of seizures.

Surgery: Purple nut sedge might lower blood sugar or slow blood clotting. There is some concern that it might interfere with bleeding or blood sugar control during surgery. Stop using purple nut sedge at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Urinary tract obstruction: Purple nut sedge might increase secretions in the urinary tract. There is concern that this could worsen urinary obstruction.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Medications for Alzheimer's disease (Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors)

Purple nut sedge contains chemicals that can affect the brain and heart. Some drying medications can also affect the brain and heart. But purple nut sedge works differently than drying medications. Purple nut sedge might decrease the effects of drying medications.Some of these drying medications include atropine, scopolamine, and some medications used for allergies (antihistamines), and for depression (antidepressants).Purple nut sedge might increase certain chemicals in the brain, heart, and elsewhere in the body. Some medications used for Alzheimer's disease also affect these chemicals. Taking purple nut sedge along with medications for Alzheimer's disease might increase effects and side effects of medications used for Alzheimer's disease.

Various medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, and other conditions (Cholinergic drugs)

Purple nut sedge might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking purple nut sedge along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), and others.Purple nut sedge might slow blood clotting. Taking purple nut sedge along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.Purple nut sedge contains a chemical that affects the body. This chemical is similar to some medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, and other conditions. Taking purple nut sedge with these medications might increase the chance of side effects.Some of these medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, and other conditions include pilocarpine (Pilocar and others), donepezil (Aricept), tacrine (Cognex), and others.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional.