Ribose

18/Description

About

Ribose is a kind of sugar that is produced by the body. It is used as a medicine.

Ribose is used to improve athletic performance and the ability to exercise by boosting muscle energy. It has also been used to improve symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), fibromyalgia, and coronary artery disease. Ribose has been used to prevent symptoms such as cramping, pain, and stiffness after exercise in people with an inherited disorder called myoadenylate deaminase deficiency (MAD) or AMP deaminase deficiency (AMPD deficiency). Ribose has also been used to improve exercise ability in people with another inherited disorder called McArdle's disease.

Healthcare providers sometimes give ribose intravenously (by IV) as part of an imaging procedure used to measure the extent of damaged heart muscle in people with coronary artery disease. Ribose has also been used intravenously in patients with MAD to prevent symptoms such as cramping, pain, and stiffness.

How it works

Ribose is an energy source that the body makes from food. There is some evidence that supplemental ribose might prevent muscle fatigue in people with genetic disorders that prevent sufficient energy production by the body. It might provide extra energy to the heart during exercise in people with heart disease.

Effectiveness

Possibly Effective
Clogged heart arteries (coronary artery disease)

Taking ribose by mouth seems to be effective for improving the heart's ability to manage low blood flow in people with coronary artery disease.

Myoadenylate deaminase deficiency (MAD)

Taking ribose by mouth or intravenously seems to be effective for preventing symptoms such as cramping, pain, and stiffness after exercise in people with MAD, also known as AMP deaminase deficiency (AMPD deficiency).

Concerns

Likely safe

Ribose seems to be LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth for short-term use or when given intravenously (by IV) by a healthcare provider. It can cause some side effects including diarrhea, stomach discomfort, nausea, headache, and low blood sugar.There isn't enough information about the safety of long-term use.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking ribose if you arepregnantorbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Are there any interactions with medications?

Diabetes: Ribose might lower blood sugar. When used along with diabetes medications that lower blood sugar, it might make blood sugar drop too low. It's best not to use ribose if you have diabetes.

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia): Ribose might lower blood sugar. If you already have blood sugar that is too low, don't take ribose.

Surgery: Since ribose might lower blood sugar, there is a concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop taking ribose at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Insulin

Ribose might decrease blood sugar. Insulin is also used to decrease blood sugar. Taking ribose along with insulin might cause your blood sugar to be too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your insulin might need to be changed.

Minor
Alcohol

Ribose might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking ribose along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (Diabeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.Alcohol might decrease your blood sugar. Ribose might also decrease your blood sugar. Taking ribose along with alcohol might cause your blood sugar to go too low.

Aspirin

Ribose might decrease blood sugar. Large amounts of aspirin might also decrease blood sugar. Taking ribose along with large amounts of aspirin might cause your blood sugar to go too low. But this interaction probably isn't a big concern for most people that take 81 mg of aspirin a day.

Choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate)

Choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate) might decrease your blood sugar. Ribose might also decrease blood sugar. Taking ribose along with choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate) might cause your blood sugar to be too low. But it is not clear if this interaction is a big concern.

Propranolol (Inderal)

Propranolol (Inderal) might decrease blood sugar. Ribose might also decrease blood sugar. Taking ribose along with propranolol (Inderal) might cause your blood sugar to go too low.

Salsalate (Disalcid)

Large amounts of salsalate (Disalcid) can cause blood sugar to become low. Taking salsalate along with ribose might cause blood sugar to become too low.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com