Rosemary

Botanicals

18/Description

About

Rosemary is an herb. Oil is extracted from the leaf and used to make medicine.

Rosemary is used for digestion problems, including heartburn, intestinal gas (flatulence), and loss of appetite. It is also used for liver and gallbladder complaints, gout, cough, headache, high blood pressure, low blood pressure, reducing age-related memory loss, improving energy and mental tiredness, opiate withdrawal symptoms, sunburn protection, and diabetic kidney disease.

Some women use rosemary for increasing menstrual flow and causing abortions.

Rosemary is applied to the skin for preventing and treating baldness It is also used for treating circulation problems, toothache, a skin condition called eczema, muscle pain, pain along the sciatic nerve, and chest wall pain. It is also used for wound healing, in bath therapy (balneotherapy), and as an insect repellent.

In foods, rosemary is used as a spice. The leaf and oil are used in foods, and the oil is used in beverages.

In manufacturing, rosemary oil is used as a fragrant component in soaps and perfumes.

How it works

Although it's not clear how rosemary works for hair loss, applying it to the scalp irritates the skin and increases blood circulation, which helps hair follicles grow.

It is possible rosemary extract protects against the damaging effects induced by UVB radiation, and can protect the skin from sun damage.

Effectiveness

Possibly Ineffective
Causing abortions

Taking rosemary by mouth does not seem to cause an abortion.

Concerns

Likely safe

Rosemary is LIKELY SAFE when consumed in amounts found in foods

Possibly safe

Rosemary is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth, applied to the skin, or inhaled as aromatherapy for medicinal purposes

Likely unsafe

However, the undiluted oil is LIKELY UNSAFE to take by mouth. Taking large amounts of rosemary can cause vomiting, uterine bleeding, kidney irritation, increased sun sensitivity, skin redness, and allergic reactions.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Rosemary isPOSSIBLY UNSAFEwhen taken by mouth in medicinal amounts. Rosemary might stimulatemenstruationoraffecttheuterus, causing amiscarriage. Not enough is known about the safety of applying rosemary to the skin duringpregnancy. If you arepregnant, it's best to avoid rosemary in amounts larger thanfoodamounts.

If you are breast-feeding, also steer clear of rosemary in medicinal amounts. Not enough is known about what effects it might have on the nursing infant.

Aspirin allergy. Rosemary contains a chemical that is very similar to aspirin. This chemical, known a as salicylate, may cause a reaction in people who are allergic to aspirin.

Bleeding disorders: Rosemary might increase the risk of bleeding and bruising in people with bleeding disorders. Use cautiously.

Seizure disorders: Rosemary might make seizure disorders worse. Don't use it.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Aspirin

Rosemary contains chemicals similar to aspirin. Taking rosemary along with aspirin might increase the effects and side effects of aspirin.

Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate (Trilisate)

Rosemary contains chemicals that are similar to choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate). Taking rosemary along with choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate) might increase the effects and side effects of choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate).

Salsalate (Disalcid)

Rosemary might slow blood clotting. Taking rosemary along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin; clopidogrel (Plavix); nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), and naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others); dalteparin (Fragmin); enoxaparin (Lovenox); heparin; warfarin (Coumadin); and others.Salsalate (Disalcid) is called a salicylate. It's similar to aspirin. Rosemary also contains a salicylate similar to aspirin. Taking salsalate with rosemary might cause there to be too much salicylates in the body. This might increase the effects and side effects of salicylates.

Minor
Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) substrates)

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Rosemary might increase how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking rosemary along with some medications that are changed by the liver might increase the break down and decrease the effects of these medications.Some of these medications that are changed by the liver include chlorzoxazone and theophylline.Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Rosemary might increase how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking rosemary along with some medications that are changed by the liver might increase the breakdown and decrease the effects of these medications.Some of these medications that are changed by the liver include acetaminophen (Tylenol), amitriptyline (Elavil), clopidogrel (Plavix), clozapine (Clozaril), cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril), diazepam (Valium), estradiol, fluvoxamine (Luvox), haloperidol (Haldol), imipramine (Tofranil), mexiletine (Mexitil), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), olanzapine (Zyprexa), ondansetron (Zofran), propranolol (Inderal), ropinirole (Requip), tacrine (Cognex), theophylline, tizanidine (Zanaflex), verapamil (Calan, Covera-HS, Isoptin, Verelan), zileuton (Zyflo), zolmitriptan (Zomig), and others.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com