Strawberry

18/Description

About

Strawberry is a plant. The fruit is eaten and used to make medicine. The leaves are also used to make medicine.

People take strawberry for a wide range of conditions including diarrhea, sluggish intestines, liver disease, yellowed skin (jaundice), pain and swelling (inflammation) of the lining of the respiratory tract, gout, arthritis, nervous tension, water retention (edema), kidney ailments involving gravel and stones, fever, night sweats, and “tired blood” (anemia).

It is also used for “purifying the blood,” stimulating metabolism, preventing menstruation, and supporting “natural weight loss.”

Some people put strawberry in a cloth and hold it against the skin (as a compress) for rashes.

How it works

Strawberry contains chemicals that are antioxidants and might keep cancer cells from multiplying. Other chemicals in strawberry might slow down the speed at which the nervous system ages. That's why some researchers are interested in studying whether strawberry might help prevent or treat Alzheimer's disease or other diseases that involve progressive loss of nerve function.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Arthritis
Diarrhea
Fever
Gout
Nervous tension
Night sweats
Rashes
Weight loss
Water retention
Stimulating metabolism
Preventing menstruation
Other conditions

Concerns

Likely safe

Strawberry is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts found in food. There isn't enough information available to know if strawberry is safe for medicinal use.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Strawberry isLIKELY SAFEforpregnantandbreast-feeding women when taken by mouth in food amounts. However, larger medicinal amounts should be avoided until more is known.Are there any interactions with medications?

Bleeding disorders: There is some concern that using strawberry in larger amounts might prolong bleeding time and increase the risk of bruising and bleeding in some people with bleeding disorders. If you have a bleeding disorder, use strawberry with caution.

Surgery: Using strawberry in larger amounts might slow blood clotting. There is some concern that it might increase the chance of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using strawberry at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)

Some medications are moved by pumps into cells. Strawberry might make these pumps less active and increase how much of some medications get absorbed by the body. This might increase the side effects of some medications.Some medications that are moved by these pumps include etoposide, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, vindesine, ketoconazole, itraconazole, amprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, cimetidine, ranitidine, diltiazem, verapamil, corticosteroids, erythromycin, cisapride (Propulsid), fexofenadine (Allegra), cyclosporine, loperamide (Imodium), quinidine, and others.Using larger amounts of strawberry might slow blood clotting. Taking strawberry along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding in some people.Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com