Sweet Orange

18/Description

About

Sweet orange is a fruit. The peel and juice are used to make medicine.

The peel of sweet orange is used to increase appetite; reduce phlegm; and treat coughs, colds, intestinal gas (flatulence), acid indigestion (dyspepsia), and cancerous breast sores. It is also used as a tonic.

Sweet orange juice is used for treating kidney stones (nephrolithiasis) and high cholesterol; and preventing high blood pressure and stroke, as well as prostate cancer.

How it works

Sweet orange contains large amounts of vitamin C. Some researchers believe sweet orange might help asthma because of the antioxidant activity of vitamin C.

Sweet orange also contains large amounts of potassium. There is evidence that potassium may help prevent high blood pressure and stroke.

Sweet orange fruit and sweet orange juice are used to prevent kidney stones because they contain large amounts of a chemical called citrate. Citrate tends to bind with calcium before it can form kidney stones.

Effectiveness

Possibly Effective
Preventing high blood pressure and stroke

Drinking sweet orange juice seems to help lower the risk of high blood pressure and stroke. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows makers of sweet orange products that provide at least 350 mg of potassium per serving and are low in sodium, saturated fat, and cholesterol to make label claims that their product might reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure and stroke.

Treating high cholesterol

Drinking sweet orange juice helps improve cholesterol levels. In large amounts (750 mL, or about three 8-oz glasses, per day for four weeks), orange juice seems to increase “good” high-density lipoprotein and reduce the ratio of “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to HDL cholesterol in people with high cholesterol.

Concerns

Unsafe

In children, taking large amounts of sweet orange peel is UNSAFE. It can cause colic, convulsions, or death.

Sweet orange seems to be safe for most adults

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Sweet orange seems safe when taken in usualfoodamounts.Are there any interactions with medications?

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Major
Celiprolol (Celicard)

Consuming large amounts of sweet orange juice might decrease how much celiprolol (Celicard) the body absorbs. This might decrease how well celiprolol (Celicard) works. To avoid this interaction, separate taking this medication from consuming sweet orange by at least 4 hours.

Ivermectin

Drinking sweet orange juice might decrease how much ivermectin the body absorbs. Taking sweet orange along with ivermectin might decrease the effectiveness of ivermectin.

Pravastatin (Pravachol)

Some medications are moved by pumps in cells. Sweet orange might change how these pumps work and decrease how much of some medications get absorbed by the body. This could make these medications less effective. To avoid this interaction, separate taking these medications from consuming sweet orange by at least 4 hours.Some of these medications that are moved by pumps in cells include bosentan (Tracleer), celiprolol (Celicard, others), etoposide (VePesid), fexofenadine (Allegra), fluoroquinolone antibiotics, glyburide (Micronase, Diabeta), irinotecan (Camptosar), methotrexate, paclitaxel (Taxol), saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase), rifampin, statins, talinolol, torsemide (Demadex), troglitazone, and valsartan (Diovan).Drinking sweet orange juice might increase how much pravastatin (Pravachol) the body absorbs. Taking pravastatin (Pravachol) with sweet orange juice might increase drug levels in the body and possibly increase the chance of drug side effects.

Moderate
Fexofenadine (Allegra)

Calcium-fortified sweet orange juice can reduce the amount of some antibiotics the body absorbs. Reduced absorption of antibiotics can reduce their ability to fight infection. Sweet orange juice without calcium is unlikely to affect quinolone antibiotics.Some quinolone antibiotics include ciprofloxacin (Cipro), enoxacin (Penetrex), gatifloxacin (Tequin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ofloxacin (Floxin), and trovafloxacin (Trovan).Sweet orange might decrease how much fexofenadine (Allegra) the body absorbs. Taking sweet orange along with fexofenadine (Allegra) might decrease the effectiveness of fexofenadine (Allegra). To avoid this interaction, separate taking this medication from consuming sweet orange by at least 4 hours.

Medications moved by pumps in cells (P-Glycoprotein substrates)

Some medications are moved by pumps in cells. Sweet orange might change how these pumps work and change how much of some medications get absorbed by the body. There is not enough information to know how important this interaction might be. Until more is known, sweet orange juice should be used cautiously with medications moved by these pumps.Some medications that are moved by these pumps include etoposide, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, vindesine, ketoconazole, itraconazole, amprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, cimetidine, ranitidine, diltiazem, verapamil, corticosteroids, erythromycin, cisapride (Propulsid), fexofenadine (Allegra), cyclosporine, loperamide (Imodium), quinidine, and others.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional.