Tyrosine

18/Description

About

Tyrosine is one of the amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. The body makes tyrosine from another amino acid called phenylalanine. Tyrosine can also be found in dairy products, meats, fish, eggs, nuts, beans, oats, and wheat.

Tyrosine is used in protein supplements to treat an inherited disorder called phenylketonuria (PKU). People who have this problem can't process phenylalanine properly, so as a result they can't make tyrosine. To meet their bodies' needs, supplemental tyrosine is given.

People take tyrosine for depression, attention deficit disorder (ADD), attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the inability to stay awake (narcolepsy), and improving alertness following sleep deprivation. It is also used for stress, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), alcohol and cocaine withdrawal, heart disease and stroke, ED (erectile dysfunction), loss of interest in sex, schizophrenia, and as a suntan agent and appetite suppressant.

Some people also apply tyrosine to the skin to reduce age-related wrinkles.

How it works

The body uses tyrosine to make chemical messengers that are involved in conditions involving the brain such as mental alertness.

Effectiveness

Effective
Phenylketonuria (PKU)

People with PKU are not able to process the amino acid phenylalanine, which is used by the body to make tyrosine. Because of this, people with PKU can have low levels of tyrosine in the body. People with PKU are advised to consume 6 grams of tyrosine per 100 grams of protein to improve tyrosine levels in the body.

Concerns

Possibly safe

Tyrosine is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in food amounts and POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by adults short-term in medicinal amounts or when applied to the skin. Tyrosine seems to be safe when used in doses up to 150 mg/kg per day for up to 3 months. Some people experience side effects such as nausea, headache, fatigue, heartburn, and joint pain.There isn't enough information available to know if tyrosine is safe for children to use in medicinal amounts. Don't give it to children without the advice of your healthcare provider until more is known.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough information available to know if tyrosine is safe to use duringpregnancyandbreast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Are there any interactions with medications?

Overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) or Graves disease: The body uses tyrosine to make thyroxine, a thyroid hormone. Taking extra tyrosine might increase thyroxine levels too much, making hyperthyroidism and Graves disease worse. If you have one of these conditions, don't take tyrosine supplements.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Moderate
Levodopa

Tyrosine might decrease how much levodopa the body absorbs. By decreasing how much levodopa the body absorbs, tyrosine might decrease the effectiveness of levodopa. Do not take tyrosine and levodopa at the same time.

Thyroid hormone

The body naturally produces thyroid hormones. Tyrosine might increase how much thyroid hormone the body produces. Taking tyrosine with thyroid hormone pills might cause there to be too much thyroid hormone. This could increase the effects and side effects of thyroid hormones.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com