Vanilla

18/Description

About

Vanilla is a plant. The bean (fruit) is commonly used to make flavoring, but it is also used to make medicine.

People take vanilla to treat intestinal gas and fever. They also use it to increase sexual desire (as an aphrodisiac).

In foods and beverages, vanilla is a well-known flavoring, but it is also added to foods to reduce the amount of sugar needed for sweetening. Some people add vanilla to food to help stop tooth decay.

In manufacturing, vanilla is used as a flavoring in syrups used in making medications. It is also used as a fragrance in perfumes.

Vanilla extract can be pricey. So lab-produced vanillin is often used as a substitute for vanilla. Sometimes vanilla extracts are diluted with less expensive extracts. Vanilla extracts from Mexico have been diluted with tonga bean extracts, but these contain a chemical called coumarin. Since 1954, the FDA has prohibited the use of coumarin in food.

How it works

Vanilla contains chemicals that are high in flavor and fragrance, but it is not known how it works for medicinal uses.

Effectiveness

Not Proven
Fever
Intestinal gas
Other conditions

Concerns

Likely safe

Vanilla is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts commonly found in foods. However, there are some side effects. Skin contact can cause irritation and swelling (inflammation). It might also cause headache and sleep problems (insomnia), especially for people who manufacture vanilla extract.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Vanilla isLIKELY SAFEforpregnantandbreast-feeding women when taken by mouth in food amounts. Larger medicinal amounts should be avoided until more is known.Dosing considerations for Vanilla.

Interactions

No information available.

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com