Whey Protein

18/Description

About

Whey protein is the protein contained in whey, the watery portion of milk that separates from the curds when making cheese.

Whey protein is used for improving athletic performance, as a food supplement, as an alternative to milk for people with lactose intolerance, for replacing or supplementing milk-based infant formulas, and for reversing weight loss and increasing glutathione (GSH) in people with HIV disease.

Whey protein is also used for protein allergy, asthma, high cholesterol, obesity and weight loss, preventing allergies in infants, late-stage cancer, and colon cancer.

How it works

Whey protein is a source of protein that might improve the nutrient content of the diet. Whey protein might also have effects on the immune system.

Effectiveness

Possibly Effective
Red, itchy skin (eczema)

Research shows that infants who consume whey protein by mouth during the first 3-12 months of life have a lower risk of developing red, itchy skin by the age of 3 years.

Prone allergies and allergic reactions (atopic disease)

Research shows that infants who consume whey protein by mouth during the first 3-12 months of life are less likely to be prone to allergies and allergic reactions compared to infants who receive standard formula. However, taking why protein might not be helpful for treating atopic diseases once they develop.

Weight loss in people with HIV/AIDS

Some research shows that taking whey protein by mouth can help decrease weight loss in people with HIV.

Red, scaly skin (psoriasis)

Some evidence shows that taking a specific whey protein extract (Dermylex Advitech Inc.) daily for 8 weeks can reduce psoriasis symptoms.

Concerns

Likely safe

Whey protein is LIKELY SAFE for most children and adults when taken by mouth appropriately. High doses can cause some side effects such as increased bowel movements, nausea, thirst, bloating, cramps, reduced appetite, tiredness (fatigue), and headache.

18/Warnings

Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking whey protein if you arepregnantorbreast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Are there any interactions with medications?

Milk allergy: If you are allergic to cow's milk, avoid using whey protein.

Interactions

Always consult with your doctor.
Major
Levodopa

Whey protein might decrease how much levodopa the body absorbs. By decreasing how much levodopa the body absorbs, whey protein might decrease the effectiveness of levodopa. Do not take whey protein and levodopa at the same time.

Moderate
Albendazole

Whey protein can decrease how much albendazole the body absorbs. Taking whey protein and albendazole at the same time can decrease the effectiveness of albendazole. Do not take whey protein while taking albendazole.

Alendronate (Fosamax)

Whey protein can decrease how much alendronate (Fosamax) the body absorbs. Taking whey protein and alendronate (Fosamax) at the same time can decrease the effectiveness of alendronate (Fosamax). Don't take whey protein within two hours of taking alendronate (Fosamax).

Antibiotics (Tetracycline antibiotics)

Whey protein might decrease how much antibiotic the body absorbs. Taking whey protein along with some antibiotics might decrease the effectiveness of some antibiotics. To avoid this interaction take whey protein supplements at least one hour after antibiotics.Some of these antibiotics that might interact with whey protein include ciprofloxacin (Cipro), enoxacin (Penetrex), norfloxacin (Chibroxin, Noroxin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), trovafloxacin (Trovan), and grepafloxacin (Raxar).Whey protein contains calcium. The calcium in whey protein can attach to tetracyclines in the stomach. This decreases the amount of tetracyclines that can be absorbed. Taking calcium with tetracyclines might decrease the effectiveness of tetracyclines. To avoid this interaction, take whey protein two hours before or four hours after taking tetracyclines.Some tetracyclines include demeclocycline (Declomycin), minocycline (Minocin), and tetracycline (Achromycin).

The information provided on this page is for reference purposes and is not meant to be used as a medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a medical professional. The content on this page has been provided with thanks by RxList.com